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These offers are no longer available on our site: Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business, Capital One® Spark® Classic for Business, Brex Card for Startups

Hear from our editors: The best business credit cards of May 2021

Updated April 30, 2021

This date may not reflect recent changes in individual terms.

Editorial note: Credit Vana receives compensation from third-party advertisers, but that doesn’t affect our editors’ opinions. Our marketing partners don’t review, approve or endorse our editorial content. It’s accurate to the best of our knowledge when posted.

Written by: Tim Devaney

The best business credit cards offer a mix of features that include cash back, travel rewards, low intro APRs and the opportunity to build credit. Here are the best business credit cards of 2021.



Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card: Best for business trips

Here’s why: The Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card could help your company pay for business travel purchases.

You’ll earn 100,000 bonus points after spending $15,000 on qualifying purchases during the first 3 months your account is open.

Sure, that’s enough points to book $1,250 worth of travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards®. But you might be able to get an even better value if you redeem your points through one of Chase’s transfer partners.

These are just a few of the many ways you could use your rewards points to make your company’s travel budget go further.

It’s also worth noting — if work takes you overseas — foreign transaction fees are $0 with this card. But there is a $95 annual fee.

Check out our review of the Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card to learn more.

Spark® Cash from Capital One®: Best for offsetting business expenses

Here’s why: You’ll earn $500 after spending $4,500 on purchases during the first 3 months after your account is opened.

We certainly wouldn’t want to encourage you to spend more than your company can afford to repay. But if your company is already planning to make a big purchase, you could redeem the cash bonus from the Spark® Cash from Capital One® as a statement credit to help you recoup some of that money.

Even if you don’t qualify for the cash bonus, you’ll still earn 2% cash back on every purchase you make (with no bonus categories or spending categories to keep track of). You can use the cash back to offset your regular business purchases.

But don’t forget about the annual fee on this card: $0 intro, $95 after first year.

Learn more in our review of the Spark® Cash from Capital One®.

Ink Business Cash® Credit Card: Best for staying on budget

Here’s why: If you’re looking for a business card but don’t want to break the bank, look no further than the Ink Business Cash® Credit Card.

The Ink Business Cash® Credit Card comes with a $0 annual fee. So you don’t have to shell out money each year just to hold the card.

But it’s more rewarding than many other no-annual-fee credit cards. You’ll earn $750 bonus cash back after your company spends $7,500 on purchases during the first 3 months from account opening.

Beyond the sign-up bonus, you’ll score 5% cash back (up to $1,250) on the first $25,000 your company spends each account anniversary year in combined purchases of internet, cable and phone services and at office supply stores. After that, you’ll get 1% cash back.

You’ll also earn 2% cash back (up to $500) on the first $25,000 your company spends each account anniversary year in combined purchases at restaurants and gas stations. After that, you’ll get 1% cash back.

You’ll also earn 1% cash back on all other purchases.

Not too shabby for a card with a $0 annual fee.

Check out our review of the Ink Business Cash® Credit Card.

The Blue Business® Plus Credit Card from American Express: Best for low interest

Here’s why: The low intro purchase APR on The Blue Business® Plus Credit Card from American Express could help you save money on interest charges while financing your business.

It features an introductory 0% APR on purchases for the first 12 months from account opening.

After that, you’ll pay a variable rate of 13.24% – 19.24% on purchases.

Plus, you’ll get two Membership Rewards® points for every $1 you spend on eligible purchases on up to $50,000 every calendar year (then one point per $1).

With a $0 annual fee, this card has a lot to offer. Learn more in our review of The Blue Business® Plus Credit Card from American Express.

Spark® Classic from Capital One®: Best for building business credit

Here’s why: The Spark® Classic from Capital One® can help you earn cash back while building credit for your business.

If you’re applying for your first business card and you don’t have strong credit (business or personal), you might have a difficult time qualifying for some of the best small-business credit cards on this list.

But the Spark® Classic from Capital One® could help you get there, if you make your payments on time and keep your credit utilization rate low.

There’s a $0 annual fee on this card, you’ll earn 1% cash back on all eligible purchases and, most importantly, you’ll have an opportunity to build your business credit.

Check out our review of the Spark® Classic from Capital One®.


How we picked the best business credit cards

To find the best business cards, we started with the assumption that there isn’t one single best business card. Each company has different needs.

We thought about what different businesses might benefit from — including business travel rewards, cash back, low intro APRs and the opportunity to build business credit — and researched the cards in each of those categories.

How do I qualify for a business credit card?

You might be surprised to learn that you could qualify for a business card.

Many people could qualify for business cards without realizing it because they don’t see themselves as small-business owners. But you don’t have to own a restaurant or a car dealership to have a business.

Many business credit cards allow independent contractors like rideshare drivers, online sellers and freelancers to apply. The big exception on this list is the Brex Card for Startups, which caters to larger businesses. Here’s how to get a business credit card.

If you do qualify for a business credit card, keep in mind that you should use the card only for business expenses. Business credit card issuers typically frown on cardholders using these cards to make purchases that should be left to their personal credit cards. Learn more with Credit Vana’s guide to business credit cards.


About the author: Tim Devaney is a personal finance writer and credit card expert at Credit Vana. He’s a longtime journalist who prides himself on being a good storyteller who can explain complex information in an easily digestible wa… Read more.

FAQ: Editors’ answers

Editorial Note: Credit Vana receives compensation from third-party advertisers, but that doesn’t affect our editors’ opinions. Our marketing partners don’t review, approve or endorse our editorial content. It’s accurate to the best of our knowledge when posted. Read our Editorial Guidelines to learn more about our team.

Can anyone apply for a business credit card?
Business cards are often marketed to small-business owners. But the requirements that determine who counts as a business owner may be more extensive than you think.
Even if your company isn’t registered as a distinct legal entity, you could consider applying for a small-business credit card — even if you’re self-employed or have a side gig. This includes freelancers, consultants, rideshare drivers, and people who sell products at online retailers like Amazon, eBay and Etsy. Keep in mind, not all business credit cards are available for sole proprietors, so you should make sure you check the terms and conditions before you apply.
If you work for yourself, this can be a great way to separate your business expenses from your personal expenses. But it’s still important to spend money carefully, because most credit card issuers require that you’ll personally be on the hook to repay any debt if your business can’t foot the bill, depending on the cardholder agreement.
Can you get a business credit card with bad credit?
If you (or your business) are still working on building your credit, qualifying for a business credit card can be challenging — but it’s still possible.
There are certain credit cards that cater to businesses and business owners with less-than-stellar credit. But depending on just how much work your credit or your business’s credit needs, you might be required to submit a refundable deposit that serves as collateral. This is a way to secure your account and assure the lender that the money you spend will be repaid.
Look for business credit cards that offer to help your company build credit. They might promise to work with “businesses with past credit challenges” or “businesses with little to no business credit history.”
Eventually, after your business demonstrates a positive track record and you build your business credit, you might qualify for other business credit cards.
Does applying for a business credit card affect personal credit?
Applying for a business credit card may have some impact on your personal credit.
When you apply for a business credit card, the issuer might run a credit check, which could result in a hard inquiry. This will show up on your personal credit reports and even drop your scores by a few points, too.
But your payment history, credit card utilization and length of credit history can have a much bigger impact on your personal credit than that hard inquiry.
Be aware that business credit card issuers could report late payments to the three major consumer credit bureaus, which can affect your personal credit. But as long as your credit card bill is paid on time each month, the issuer might not report the account activity to your personal credit at all. In these cases, carrying a balance on a business credit card might not be reflected in the credit card utilization portion of your personal credit. And opening a new business card won’t affect your length of credit history either. If this is the case, the impact these business credit cards have on your personal credit will be limited.
But it’s possible for some business credit card issuers to report all of your business account activity to the personal credit bureaus. So it’s important to check with each issuer before applying.
What are the benefits of business credit cards?
As your company grows, it may become more and more important to separate your business expenses from your personal expenses. A business credit card can help you keep track of everything.
Opening a business credit card can also help your company establish credit, which could be important if your company ever needs to borrow money. And the credit card itself can be helpful if your business needs access to a line of credit in a pinch.
Depending on which business credit card you apply for, your business might be able to earn rewards or cash back for your business-related purchases, which you could use to offset company-related expenses.
These points above are just a few of the benefits business credit cards offer.
How do you build business credit?
Building business credit is similar to building personal credit: Your company needs to demonstrate that it’s responsible with the money it borrows.
You can get started by registering your business with the IRS to obtain a federal employer identification number, so lenders have a way to identify your company.
After that, you might want to consider applying for a business credit card, business loan, vendor credit or supplier credit on behalf of your business — as long as they report to a business credit bureau. Whichever method you prefer, it’s important that you pay your business credit card on time, and if you can, early.
Last but not least, keep an eye on your progress by regularly checking your business credit reports from credit bureaus such as Dun & Bradstreet, Equifax Business and Experian Business.
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†† The opinions you read here come from our editorial team. Credit Vana receives compensation from third-party advertisers, but that doesn’t affect our editors’ opinions. Our marketing partners don’t review, approve or endorse our editorial content. It’s accurate to the best of our knowledge when it’s posted.